Terrorism? – what if we become brave

Do you by any chance know how many people die due to road accidents in India? I did’nt, until I found it on BBC. And it is 90000 road deaths per year. It comes out to around 250 people a day. What do you think of ‘250’ ..is it large, small. Are you sad about those many deaths?

Now how many people die of bomb explosions in India per year. I could not find any data about that, but I can bet that number is far far smaller than 90000 per year.

Do you see where I am going with my comparison?

Now what does a terrorist intend to accomplish with a successful explosion? Is the number of deaths their main priority? Or is the terror people feel more lovely to them? How many deaths in the last Delhi blasts? 40-50? If you feel I am trying to make these deaths seem less important, you are wrong. These people in a way are comparable to our soldiers who die on the fronts. But I objectively and actively discourage the terror people feel when these blasts happen.

When I heard about today’s blasts at Mehrauli, the first thing I and Samrat did was go to PVR complex. We were discussing the same thing, and this was the conclusion we reached. If as a citizen there is something I can do against terrorism, it is this: stop feeling terrorized. When we reached the complex, we saw it was packed with police and they were shutting everything. The shop keepers were obviously not happy, not with the police, with the situation. They would loose business on a saturday. So in fact the terrorists got the benefit of another blast without doing anything. But I could see people ambling about, I guess people like me.

I say show the middle finger to the terrorists. Whenever a blast happens anywhere, go there once everything opens. Unlike the usual behavior, say avoiding gaffar market. What do you think? Are their more ways we can do our bit? I would love to hear.

Finally, if you feel terrorized the terrorists succeed, remember that.

Heavy metal in Baghdad

I am big fan of documentary. Given a choice between a well made documentary and a well made cinem, I would always choose the documentary. Why I think good documentary’s are more difficult to make than cinema, would need a whole post. And that will come later. Right now I am in still in the high of Heavy metal in Baghdad. And it was the best documentary I have seen.

It follows a band called Acrassicauda (latin name for the black scorpion) which is the only heavy metal band in Iraq. During a period of three years, starting from the time Saddam’s regime fell, to 2007, the director followed the band. I don’t like giving out spoilers in my reviews, so I won’t. All I would say is, the director made me headbang and the director made me cry.

So if you like documentaries DO  NOT miss it.

Halaal?

Since around 20 days, my home looks like a terrorist bomb site. My whole terrace has been laid with marble. Which when was about to get finished my landlord thought of doing more beautifications.

Anyway, I have a nice rapport with the workers.

Yesterday we ordered a bucket of chicken masala. Which was enormous, and we could’nt even finish a quarter of it. Now S had this good idea of giving rest of the chicken to the workers. So today morning I asked them.
You guys do have chicken, right?
Haan bhaiyya we do have chicken, but we only have the halaal kind.
okkk.

Now I was slightly pissed off. Then I wondered should I be? I personally have eaten non-veg in my muslim friends’. And they have eaten in mine. Should the religious rules be followed rigidly or should they be considered as guidelines which when the context demands can be broken?

First instance of Egalitarianism?

I have started reading “Ka“. :), my namesake, it means “who” in sanskrit.

The first chapter begins the story of Garuda. He hatched out of its egg after 500 years. His mother Vinata looked over and protected the egg all these 500 years. When he hatched, his mother told him her story, and gave him his first mission. The mission which would end Vinata’s slavery to her sister. Garuda listened and absorbed everything.

Garuda was all set for the mission, only for the fact, that he was hungry. Hungry for 500 years. His mother told him to go to a nearby island, and that he could eat all the nishadas he could. But only thing he had to keep in mind that he should never eat a Brahman. Now Garuda has no clue what a brahman is or what a nishada is. He has just seen his mother, his aunt and his cousins which are snakes. Anyway he hopes when the time comes he will know and flies away.

He comes to the island and picks of hundreds of nishadas with his beak. The nishadas fell down into the endless well that is his empty stomach. Suddenly he feels something stuck in his throat, and an immense pain. He realized that he must have accidently swallowed a brahmin. He tells the brahmin to please come out of his throat, and that he is really sorry. The brahmin is holding onto a nishada woman and says that he won’t come out without her. Garuda says whatever, just please come out. When he sees the woman, he thinks she looks just like his mother. And realizes that the thousands he had swallowed must be similar to her. He is overcome with guilt and flies away hungry.

He does get to eat later, an elephant and a turtle. But the main thing which comes out of this episode are these:
1. Brahmins where obviously considered top and even devas could’nt harm them.(pain in his throat)
2. Nishadas were considered lowly so that they could be eaten. (Vinata tells garuda that he can eat all the nishadas he wants)
3. When Garuda sees the similarity between the nishada woman and his mother, he feels guilty. (why does he? what is the point of this in the story? )
4. A brahmin has a nishada woman as his mate and is ready to die with her (how come this cross caste bond)

The only plausible reason is, even in that age some people obviously had egalitarianism on their minds.